Things to Know for 2017 Festival

Joining us for the Festival? Here’s what you need to know!

This year marks our 15th Anniversary Season!  From Thursday, October 12th to Sunday, October 15th and an encore weekend October 20th to 22nd, we’ll be bringing you 46 of the best conservation films in the world. We are welcoming many filmmakers and conservation experts to town for post screening discussions.  Be sure to check out our FULL SCHEDULE as you make your plans.

Festival Headquarters at the Entler Hotel, 129 E. German Street, Shepherdstown (next to Shepherdstown Visitors Center). Purchase tickets, pick up a program, meet other festival goers! Come see us!

Headquarters Hours:

Wednesday, October 11th – 2pm to 6pm
Thursday, October 12th – 2pm-6pm
Friday, October 13th – 2pm – 6pm
Saturday, October  14th – noon – 6pm
Sunday, October 15th – noon – 6pm

TICKETS

We strongly encourage you to purchase festival tickets online HERE to guarantee your seat.

Tickets are available for purchase NOW at The Local Source:  133 W. German Street.

You may also purchase tickets during the Festival at our Festival Headquarters at the Entler Hotel, 129 E. German Street in Shepherdstown (see hours above) or at each festival venue.

We have 5 types of tickets:

Full Festival Pass – $55 – entrance into all films at all venues both weekends

1st Weekend Pass – $40 – entrance into all films from Friday, October 13-Sunday, October 15

2nd Weekend Pass – $25 – entrance into all films from Friday, October 20 – Sunday, October 22

Block Ticket (multiple films) – $10 – entrance into all films during a specific time block at a specific venue

Block Ticket (single film) – $7 – entrance into blocks 1, 5, 10, 15

Students 18 & younger are admitted free of charge to all films as space allows.

All films on Shepherd Campus are FREE to SU students, staff, and faculty with Rambler ID

Details regarding tickets and film venues can be found here.

Doors open at each venue a half hour before each film block.

We strongly encourage you to arrive 20-30 minutes before start time to be sure you have a seat.

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

We’re inviting audience members and filmmakers to join us at the following gatherings:

Thursday, October 12 – Festival Kick-off Reception at Popodicon, 109 Shepherd Grade Road, Shepherdstown. Enjoy refreshments and meeting filmmakers and other festival goers to kick off the festival weekend! Sponsored by Tito’s Handmade Vodka.  $20/person.

Saturday, October 14 – WRAP PARTY at the Blue Moon from 9:30pm to 11pm with free hors d’oeuvres and cash bar.

PARKING

Please give yourself plenty of time to find parking and get to your venue(s). Free street parking is available Fridays after 6pm and Saturdays and Sundays, but do not park in residential parking zones! Parking is also available in lots A and B on Shepherd University.

You can check out a Shepherdstown map here and a Shepherd University Parking Map here.

We look forward to seeing you!

15th Anniversary Festival Promises Wonder & Inspiration

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – September 21, 2017

15th Annual American Conservation Film Festival Announces 2017 Schedule
46 Exceptional Films on Wildlife, Rivers, Climate Change, Trees, and Conservation Heroes

DOWNLOAD PRESS RELEASE

Shepherdstown, WV – The 15th annual American Conservation Film Festival opens Thursday, October 12th with a festive reception and free film screening and culminates with its Encore Award Winners Weekend October 20-22. The Festival brings together the finest conservation films and filmmakers from around the world and features discussions with scientists and educators, professional workshops, family programming, and social events — all with the mission of engaging, informing, and inspiring its audience through the power of film.

Green Fire Award winning film, Disobedience, tells the story of the powerful movement coming together across the globe to defend our planet from fossil fuels and climate change and the profound legacy of civil disobedience that has inspired these courageous activists to action.

 

 

The Gateway Bug, the 2017 Green Spark Award winner for Inspiring the Next Generation, exposes America’s disconnect with food as climate catastrophe, uncovering daily habits individuals can change to fix our broken food system. The film is followed by a special tasting of bug protein products with local entomophagy enthusiast Steve Bailes preparing some tasty treats to share with film-goers in the Frank Center lobby!

 

 

As a special free event during our Encore Weekend, ACFF presents a film block dedicated to the relationship between earth stewardship and faith, with a presentation by Randy Tremba, recently retired Pastor of Shepherdstown Presbyterian Church.

At four venues in and around Shepherdstown, ACFF invites its audience to explore the world through an offering of 46 compelling films. Several filmmakers and subject matter experts will be present during the festival and participating in discussions following the screenings of their films.

 

 

 

 

 

The Conservation Filmmaker Workshop is offered October 13 and 14 at the National Conservation Training Center and ByrdCenter of Congressional History & Education to aspiring and professional filmmakers who wish to hone their craft, exchange ideas in a creative and collaborative

environment, and expand their professional network with colleagues and industry leaders. An exceptional opportunity awaits filmmakers who wish to pitch a film idea to a Pitch Panel of industry experts and compete for a $2,000 prize sponsored by The Allemall Foundation.

ACFF presents seven cash awards to outstanding festival films: the Green Fire Award for overall excellence in filmmaking; Green Spark Awards for highlighting sustainability, a conservation hero, and inspiring the next generation; International Film Award; Short Film Award; the Student Filmmaker Award, a $500 cash prize awarded to an emerging student filmmaker sponsored by The Friends of NCTC; and the Audience Choice Award. All of the award-winning films will be shown on the encore weekend of the Festival, October 20-22.

Full festival passes, allowing entrance to all films over both festival weekends are $55; First weekend passes are $40; second weekend passes are $25; and block tickets are $10. Senior discounts are available. Students 18 & younger are admitted free to all films as space allows. 

2017 Festival Trailer: https://vimeo.com/231397659 Film descriptions, schedule, and ticket info: www.conservationfilm.org. Follow ACFF on Facebook (@conservationfilm.org), Instagram (@conservationfilmfest) and Twitter (@ConservationFF).

 

About ACFF

The American Conservation Film Festival is an annual event held in Shepherdstown, WV, a vibrant arts community 70 miles west of Washington, DC and Baltimore, MD. ACFF features films from a diverse group of conservation filmmakers from all around the world.

This 501(c)(3) non-profit organization addresses conservation through the lens of film, providing a platform for education and dialogue about more sustainable ways to live. ACFF programming promotes solutions to pressing conservation issues, respect for the world’s natural and cultural heritage, and passion for conserving our resources. Since 2003, the Festival has screened over 500 films to over 33,000 audience members, presented filmmaking workshops for aspiring documentary filmmakers, hosted panel discussions with filmmakers, and offered free family programs with the mission of engaging, informing, and inspiring people toward better ways to live, work, and play.

The 2017 American Conservation Film Festival is sponsored by: The Campbell Foundation, HHMI Tangled Bank Studios, The Allemall Foundation, the Nora Roberts Foundation, Shepherd University, Tito’s Handmade Vodka, Schutte-Box & Yenser Wealth Management, Friends of NCTC, Route 11 Potato Chips, Hobert & Kerr, P.C., Jefferson County Convention & Visitors Bureau, Redfin, Sustainable Solutions, Winchester Gastroenterology Associates, and Spirit of Jefferson newspaper.

Press Contact:

Jennifer Lee, ACFF Development & Communications Director

jennifer@conservationfilm.org

Excerpts from Saving Place, Saving Grace

7 & 5 Minutes
Filmmakers: George Patterson and Deidra Dain

TRAILER 

Click Image for Trailer!

Excerpts from a PBS documentary tells the story of a local Trappist monastery’s struggle for reformation of their home by embracing an intense sustainability initiative. 

Screens on Saturday, October 21 during BLOCK 16, which begins at 1:00 pm at the Frank Center.

Local Pastor, Randy Tremba, will lead a post -film discussion on the intersection of faith and earth stewardship.

PLEASE REGISTER FOR YOUR FREE TICKET HERE.

An Ocean Mystery: The Missing Catch

46 Minutes
Filmmaker: Alison Barrat

TRAILER

Click Image For Trailer!

 Follows the work of the world’s premier fisheries scientist, Dr. Daniel Pauly, as he investigates how close we are to a global crash in fish populations.  This film, narrated by Ted Danson, follows the work of the world’s premier fisheries scientist, Dr. Daniel Pauly, as he investigates how close we are to a global crash in fish populations. 85 percent of global fish stocks have been pushed to the brink. This team of researchers, from around the world, bring you the biggest scientific fish story ever told!

Award-winning filmmaker, Alison Barrat, joins us for a post-show discussion.

Screens on Saturday, October 14th in Block 6 beginning at 4:00 PM in Reynolds Hall AND on Sunday, October 22nd in Block 19 beginning at 3:00 PM at the Frank Center.

Buy Tickets Here

NEXT GEN CAPTURE CONSERVATION CONTEST

ACFF Announces the Next Gen Capture Conservation Project & Contest

A Youth-targeted Short Film Initiative

June 2017 – ACFF challenges and invites young people ages 5 to 18 to create and submit a short video capturing what conservation and their relationship to nature and the world around them means to them. The purpose is to encourage youth to explore conservation issues and the environment and connect it with a personal video message that captures that relationship. Selected films will be featured on ACFF social media channels and the website and catalogued in a dedicated ACFF youth film archive.

The American Conservation Film Festival is an annual 5-day event held in Shepherdstown, West Virginia, a vibrant arts community 70 miles west of the nation’s capital.  2017 will mark the 15th annual film festival scheduled for Oct 13-15, with an encore showing Oct 20-22. The festival will feature about three dozen exceptional conservation-themed films selected from more than 250 film submissions from 38 countries. Filmmakers and conservation experts, family programming, a filmmaker workshop, and receptions round out the festival’s offerings.

The Next Gen Capture Conservation Project & Contest is open to youth ages 5 to 18, with four categories: 5 to 10, 11 to 14, 15 to 18, and team project of mixed ages. Prizes of $100 cash will be awarded in each category with a top prize of $250 and iPad mini awarded for the video that tells the most compelling story of the youth’s relationship to conservation. Videos shall not exceed four minutes in length and will be judged on the power and relevancy of the conservation message, originality/creativity, and the overall production value, in that order. Videos should be uploaded to the designated ACFF Vimeo channel for this group: https://vimeo.com/groups/nextgencapture

More information, submission guidelines, instructions on uploading videos to the ACFF Vimeo channel, and tips and examples for young filmmakers can be found at the ACFF website at http://conservationfilm.org/attend/next-gen-capture-conservation-project-contest/

Please contact Jennifer Lee at jennifer@conservationfilm.org if you have questions.

The 2017 deadline for submissions is August 15, 2017.

#NextGenCaptureConservation

The Next Step

After I graduate college in May, I plan on soon getting into the film industry bringing a voice to people that might not have one. Films have always been my passion. And a good film moves you to do something, I believe talking about issues that are important but swept under the rug could make people do something. That’s what motivates me to continue in this field. I want to create visual pieces that move people to think differently than before and experience something new. I want to be someone who can create art in the form of film for people to enjoy and get their own personal message from.

The Next Step

As I’ve mentioned before, my post-graduate plans have changed a few times as my interests shifted: from politics and law, to writing and journalism, to film and documentaries, to education and service. I am so excited to tell you that I have been accepted into AmeriCorps and will be working with Notre Dame Mission Volunteers this coming fall. NDMV works to empower and build communities and individuals in impoverished areas through education. I will be working in Baltimore, Maryland, teaching and tutoring students of many different age groups.

My time volunteering at One experience during my time with the We Can Tutoring Program specifically impacted my interest in educating youth. There was a 2nd grade male student who I, and my co-volunteers, had a hard time managing in the classroom setting. One day, while the group was working on an arts and crafts project, he had a meltdown when his brother received praise on his project by another volunteer. I took him into the hall to let him calm down. I told him it was okay to cry, and okay to feel angry – he was unresponsive. While he was crying with his head against the wall I pulled out a box of blocks and dumped them out on the floor. It made a loud noise of course, and it caught his attention. I handed him another box and he did the same. I watched him build towers, and archways, and buildings for 20 minutes on the floor in the hall way. He was the most focused and calm I had ever seen him. So, I got the idea to incorporate this into his math lessons. We found our own space away from the other kids and I would give him a certain number of blocks to build whatever he wanted. Then I would tell him to subtract a number from that, tell me how many were left, and build something new. I witnessed a breakthrough with this student, and learned so much from him and about him within just 45 minutes of one-on-one attention.

I realized that in all of those days spent trying to keep him in his seat, with his worksheets in the classroom, we had failed him. He is no less smart or motivated than the other students, he just learns and succeeds in a different way. It suddenly made sense to me why his teachers had never been able to break through to him. He was held back in school twice already and it makes sense. A teacher in a classroom of 20+ students would never get the opportunity that I did to sit down with him one-on-one and figure out what works for him. This event sparked my interest in organizations like NDMV that provide personal tutors outside of the classroom setting. It also has lead me to set a Master’s Degree in Education as a long-term goal. I learned first-hand the power of education when it best suits the individual student.

On Inspiration

I have been very interested in not only bringing more awareness to the issue of trans youth homelessness but trying to do something to prevent it further and helping those who have been affected. I am planning on contacting LGBTQ organizations like True Colors Fund to see if there is anything I can do as of now because it is a problem that not too many people are aware of. Being transgender myself I have more of a vested interest because I don’t want these kids going through life thinking they are alone. Embracing your gender can be tough for children growing up. The last thing these kids needs is their parents or guardians telling them they are wrong.

On Inspiration

I’ve found inspiration in many forms over the past four years. I’ve been inspired by exceptional professors at Shepherd University, my family members, and my co-workers. Not to mention artists like Maya Angelou, writers like Tony Morison, activists like Prince Ea, and politicians like Elizabeth Warren. But the people who inspire me most are my peers.

I’ve been fortunate enough to be involved on two teams at Shepherd University whose members push me to be my best, support me in every endeavor, and give me hope for our future as nation and world.

The first is the Multicultural Leadership Team (MLT) which I talked about in my first blog post. MLT is a group of social justice advocates whose efforts are rooted in service and community involvement. I’ve gained teammates from all over the world, and learned about so many new perspectives and cultures are not covered or represented in my classes. MLT has given me a passion for social justice, and provided me with the tools to be a leader and advocate in my community. Most importantly, it has shown me the power and beauty in diversity – something that I crave to experience, and that has guided me to seek a place with more diversity in my post-graduate endeavors.

The second team that has shaped me at Shepherd is the Debate and Forensics Team. A dear friend of mine roped me into joining last semester and it has turned out to be one of the best decisions I’ve made in college. Not only do I get to surround myself with intelligent, like-minded people with impeccable speaking and arguing skills, but I also found a new form of creative expression that has been an essential part of my life the past year. I participated in poetry and prose interpretation events that allowed me to find pieces I’m passionate about, compile them in a creative way, and deliver them with power and precision. My pieces covered topics like feminism, political awareness, environmental activism, and gender equality.

This semester I spearheaded our Showcase event that took place at Town Run Brewery. After watching all of my teammates nail their performances back to back, I realized how socially conscious and aware every single piece was: from mental illness and alcoholism awareness to LGBTQ activism and more. The event was a blast, it went perfectly (besides losing my phone charger). We even got to collect tons feminine hygiene donations for the Go With the Flow campaign, created by Kaitlyn Miller, a fellow MLT member.

This team, like MLT, is made up of driven, compassionate students. Knowing that I have friends like these who will be leaders in the world very soon, gives me so much hope for my generation and those to come. I have so many sources of inspiration around me, in my peers, teammates, and friends.

Check out a goofy little promo video some debaters made for the team: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJVvgos4a1s

 

On Education

My teachers have always been the reason I maintain interest in academic settings. A teacher who is passionate about their work is inspiring, not only to accomplish more in that field but also to put that sort of dedication to your own passion. Teachers at Shepherd University have inspired me and opened my eyes to things I never even contemplated. What really means a lot is when these teachers encourage me to do my best and give me positive reinforcement when I succeed on a task I put a lot of work into. The teachers who teach me about passion inspire me to try and do great things for the people around me.

~Blair Cherelstein