Excerpts from Saving Place, Saving Grace

7 & 5 Minutes
Filmmakers: George Patterson and Deidra Dain

TRAILER 

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Excerpts from a PBS documentary tell the story of a local Trappist monastery’s struggle for reformation of their home by embracing an intense sustainability initiative. 

Screens on Saturday, October 21 during BLOCK 16, which begins at 1:00 pm at the Frank Center.

FREE ADMISSION TO ALL!

An Ocean Mystery: The Missing Catch

46 Minutes
Filmmaker: Alison Barrat

TRAILER

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 Follows the work of the world’s premier fisheries scientist, Dr. Daniel Pauly, as he investigates how close we are to a global crash in fish populations.

Screens on Saturday, October 14th in Block 6 beginning at 4:00 PM in Reynolds Hall AND on Sunday, October 22nd in Block 19 beginning at 3:00 PM at the Frank Center.

NEXT GEN CAPTURE CONSERVATION CONTEST

ACFF Announces the Next Gen Capture Conservation Project & Contest

A Youth-targeted Short Film Initiative

June 2017 – ACFF challenges and invites young people ages 5 to 18 to create and submit a short video capturing what conservation and their relationship to nature and the world around them means to them. The purpose is to encourage youth to explore conservation issues and the environment and connect it with a personal video message that captures that relationship. Selected films will be featured on ACFF social media channels and the website and catalogued in a dedicated ACFF youth film archive.

The American Conservation Film Festival is an annual 5-day event held in Shepherdstown, West Virginia, a vibrant arts community 70 miles west of the nation’s capital.  2017 will mark the 15th annual film festival scheduled for Oct 13-15, with an encore showing Oct 20-22. The festival will feature about three dozen exceptional conservation-themed films selected from more than 250 film submissions from 38 countries. Filmmakers and conservation experts, family programming, a filmmaker workshop, and receptions round out the festival’s offerings.

The Next Gen Capture Conservation Project & Contest is open to youth ages 5 to 18, with four categories: 5 to 10, 11 to 14, 15 to 18, and team project of mixed ages. Prizes of $100 cash will be awarded in each category with a top prize of $250 and iPad mini awarded for the video that tells the most compelling story of the youth’s relationship to conservation. Videos shall not exceed four minutes in length and will be judged on the power and relevancy of the conservation message, originality/creativity, and the overall production value, in that order. Videos should be uploaded to the designated ACFF Vimeo channel for this group: https://vimeo.com/groups/nextgencapture

More information, submission guidelines, instructions on uploading videos to the ACFF Vimeo channel, and tips and examples for young filmmakers can be found at the ACFF website at http://conservationfilm.org/attend/next-gen-capture-conservation-project-contest/

Please contact Jennifer Lee at jennifer@conservationfilm.org if you have questions.

The 2017 deadline for submissions is August 15, 2017.

#NextGenCaptureConservation

The Next Step

After I graduate college in May, I plan on soon getting into the film industry bringing a voice to people that might not have one. Films have always been my passion. And a good film moves you to do something, I believe talking about issues that are important but swept under the rug could make people do something. That’s what motivates me to continue in this field. I want to create visual pieces that move people to think differently than before and experience something new. I want to be someone who can create art in the form of film for people to enjoy and get their own personal message from.

The Next Step

As I’ve mentioned before, my post-graduate plans have changed a few times as my interests shifted: from politics and law, to writing and journalism, to film and documentaries, to education and service. I am so excited to tell you that I have been accepted into AmeriCorps and will be working with Notre Dame Mission Volunteers this coming fall. NDMV works to empower and build communities and individuals in impoverished areas through education. I will be working in Baltimore, Maryland, teaching and tutoring students of many different age groups.

My time volunteering at One experience during my time with the We Can Tutoring Program specifically impacted my interest in educating youth. There was a 2nd grade male student who I, and my co-volunteers, had a hard time managing in the classroom setting. One day, while the group was working on an arts and crafts project, he had a meltdown when his brother received praise on his project by another volunteer. I took him into the hall to let him calm down. I told him it was okay to cry, and okay to feel angry – he was unresponsive. While he was crying with his head against the wall I pulled out a box of blocks and dumped them out on the floor. It made a loud noise of course, and it caught his attention. I handed him another box and he did the same. I watched him build towers, and archways, and buildings for 20 minutes on the floor in the hall way. He was the most focused and calm I had ever seen him. So, I got the idea to incorporate this into his math lessons. We found our own space away from the other kids and I would give him a certain number of blocks to build whatever he wanted. Then I would tell him to subtract a number from that, tell me how many were left, and build something new. I witnessed a breakthrough with this student, and learned so much from him and about him within just 45 minutes of one-on-one attention.

I realized that in all of those days spent trying to keep him in his seat, with his worksheets in the classroom, we had failed him. He is no less smart or motivated than the other students, he just learns and succeeds in a different way. It suddenly made sense to me why his teachers had never been able to break through to him. He was held back in school twice already and it makes sense. A teacher in a classroom of 20+ students would never get the opportunity that I did to sit down with him one-on-one and figure out what works for him. This event sparked my interest in organizations like NDMV that provide personal tutors outside of the classroom setting. It also has lead me to set a Master’s Degree in Education as a long-term goal. I learned first-hand the power of education when it best suits the individual student.

On Inspiration

I have been very interested in not only bringing more awareness to the issue of trans youth homelessness but trying to do something to prevent it further and helping those who have been affected. I am planning on contacting LGBTQ organizations like True Colors Fund to see if there is anything I can do as of now because it is a problem that not too many people are aware of. Being transgender myself I have more of a vested interest because I don’t want these kids going through life thinking they are alone. Embracing your gender can be tough for children growing up. The last thing these kids needs is their parents or guardians telling them they are wrong.

On Inspiration

I’ve found inspiration in many forms over the past four years. I’ve been inspired by exceptional professors at Shepherd University, my family members, and my co-workers. Not to mention artists like Maya Angelou, writers like Tony Morison, activists like Prince Ea, and politicians like Elizabeth Warren. But the people who inspire me most are my peers.

I’ve been fortunate enough to be involved on two teams at Shepherd University whose members push me to be my best, support me in every endeavor, and give me hope for our future as nation and world.

The first is the Multicultural Leadership Team (MLT) which I talked about in my first blog post. MLT is a group of social justice advocates whose efforts are rooted in service and community involvement. I’ve gained teammates from all over the world, and learned about so many new perspectives and cultures are not covered or represented in my classes. MLT has given me a passion for social justice, and provided me with the tools to be a leader and advocate in my community. Most importantly, it has shown me the power and beauty in diversity – something that I crave to experience, and that has guided me to seek a place with more diversity in my post-graduate endeavors.

The second team that has shaped me at Shepherd is the Debate and Forensics Team. A dear friend of mine roped me into joining last semester and it has turned out to be one of the best decisions I’ve made in college. Not only do I get to surround myself with intelligent, like-minded people with impeccable speaking and arguing skills, but I also found a new form of creative expression that has been an essential part of my life the past year. I participated in poetry and prose interpretation events that allowed me to find pieces I’m passionate about, compile them in a creative way, and deliver them with power and precision. My pieces covered topics like feminism, political awareness, environmental activism, and gender equality.

This semester I spearheaded our Showcase event that took place at Town Run Brewery. After watching all of my teammates nail their performances back to back, I realized how socially conscious and aware every single piece was: from mental illness and alcoholism awareness to LGBTQ activism and more. The event was a blast, it went perfectly (besides losing my phone charger). We even got to collect tons feminine hygiene donations for the Go With the Flow campaign, created by Kaitlyn Miller, a fellow MLT member.

This team, like MLT, is made up of driven, compassionate students. Knowing that I have friends like these who will be leaders in the world very soon, gives me so much hope for my generation and those to come. I have so many sources of inspiration around me, in my peers, teammates, and friends.

Check out a goofy little promo video some debaters made for the team: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJVvgos4a1s

 

On Education

My teachers have always been the reason I maintain interest in academic settings. A teacher who is passionate about their work is inspiring, not only to accomplish more in that field but also to put that sort of dedication to your own passion. Teachers at Shepherd University have inspired me and opened my eyes to things I never even contemplated. What really means a lot is when these teachers encourage me to do my best and give me positive reinforcement when I succeed on a task I put a lot of work into. The teachers who teach me about passion inspire me to try and do great things for the people around me.

~Blair Cherelstein

On Education

Education is key.

After venting to my dad about how nervous I was to take my first upper division class in the political science department, he said something I will never forget: “Mags, there’s nothing you don’t know that you can’t learn.” These are words I’ve thought back to time and time again – when I get a bad grade, struggle understanding a concept in class, or spend 8 hours trying to navigate the inner works of WordPress. I consider my constant desire to learn more, my genuine enjoyment of my seminar classes, my craving to find the answers to questions, a privilege.

I grew up in a house where education was valued, and where my best performance was expected. I went to a very small private school from kindergarten to 8th grade, and then a large public high school before attending Shepherd University. Education was always a given for me. School was always a place where I felt like I belonged, weather I wanted to be there on that particular day or not.

Unfortunately, this is not the experience of millions of children in the U.S. today. I learned this first hand while volunteering with Children’s Home Society in Martinsburg, WV. The Children’s Home Society has a tutoring program that services students from low-income communities who are referred by their teachers for at risk of failing. Every other Saturday the children come in and work on homework, math, reading, and spelling worksheets, and arts and craft activities.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qzY5bdmyZ3o

I learned a few things very quickly. First, these kids are not aware of their immense capacity to learn. Second, most believe that they are not capable of producing good work. Third, no one at home is monitoring or encouraging their academic success. It is so easy for these students to slip through the cracks in the public school system. Many students who fail are eventually passed on because the teacher doesn’t have either the desire or resources to get them up to speed.

This experience in working to empower youth through education has led me to pursue a career as a teacher, and maybe one day, to impact education policymaking. Every student, regardless of their race, gender, sexuality, or socioeconomic status, deserves to be given the opportunity I was. Everyone deserves to be told that they are smart, capable, and valuable to our world. It’s my goal as a future educator to make sure each of my students know and believes this about themselves.

~Maggie Cohee Nevin

What I Care About

I have Faith in Feminism.

I am the raging feminist in any given group. You can count on me to call out every patriarchal macroaggression at the party, to go into what is now a well-rehearsed rant any time someone says “grow some balls”, and to beat the dead horse when it comes to whether or not Vice President Pence should have lunch with a female colleagues without the presence of his wife. I can’t tell you the number of times a friend has rolled their eyes I break down the reinforcement of the gender binary, or how many times I’ve heard, “Here she goes again,” as I complain about the toxicity of masculinity in our society.

Feminism to me is not merely the belief and activism for gender equality, and gender equality is not only the belief that women should be afforded the same privileges as men. Feminism to me, is the belief that every marginalized group deserves to have their voices heard, and receive the same benefits that the majority receives. The fight for gender equality means relief for all women from the misogynistic cultural and political systems in which we are rooted, and relief for all man from the pressures of a violent, suppressive, hyper masculinity.

I won’t shut up. I’ll continue start conversations, not at the right time, not in the right place, and not on a popular topic. And some people around me will probably continue to roll their eyes, and turn their heads. But I won’t stop talking until running “like a girl” is considered as a complement, until the phrase “man up” is replaced by “be strong,” and until Mike Pence having lunch with a female colleague is viewed the same as Mike Pence having lunch with a male colleague. I have faith that efforts in the name of feminism will one day bring about this equal culture that we long for and desperately need, but we have a lot of work to do before that day can come.

~Maggie Cohee Nevin